My Known Images:
Metallic Mill [aka Bi-Metallic Mill]
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This page has a total of 4 images, as of 19.07.2022 (09:46:32).
Most Recent added/changed image is on top.
View of one of the six tubular roasting furnaces that was in use at the Metallic Mill back in 1897/98 when this image was taken. The tubular roasting furnaces was of the same general design as the dryers; 'which was four steel tubes nested together inside two track-bands and connected at the feed and discharge ends by two hoods. The tubes were lined with fireclay tile and revolve as one cylinder,' they were, however, built much stronger. The discharge was also different.
   As the text this image came with said; ''In the standard roaster the tubes are 29 ft. long by 25 in. diameter inside the lining. They make one revolution in 4.8 minutes and average 48 tons per day from 2% to 0.1% sulphur. The roasted ore is discharged continuously through a series of openings in the periphery of the hood. All these except the two over the ore-hopper at any one time are covered with a band of iron which prevents the exit of flame around the top of the furnace. The fire-box is built of steel plate and mounted on wheels. The furnace is driven with friction wheels at each track band, operated through a differential drive which insures an absolutely even motion. These furnaces are patented in the United States and abroad.''
   This seems to have been an invention by Philip Argall and hence it is named 'Argall Roasting Furnace'. I did procure the colored version of this image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Media Info Last Updated:
05.05.2022 (14:20:36)
Title on Image:
Argall Roasting Furnace, Cyanide, Colo.
Photographer [Date]:
Unknown
Description:
View of one of the six tubular roasting furnaces that was in use at the Metallic Mill back in 1897/98 when this image was taken. The tubular roasting furnaces was of the same general design as the dryers; 'which was four steel tubes nested together inside two track-bands and connected at the feed and discharge ends by two hoods. The tubes were lined with fireclay tile and revolve as one cylinder,' they were, however, built much stronger. The discharge was also different.
graphic for visual presentation of text As the text this image came with said; ''In the standard roaster the tubes are 29 ft. long by 25 in. diameter inside the lining. They make one revolution in 4.8 minutes and average 48 tons per day from 2% to 0.1% sulphur. The roasted ore is discharged continuously through a series of openings in the periphery of the hood. All these except the two over the ore-hopper at any one time are covered with a band of iron which prevents the exit of flame around the top of the furnace. The fire-box is built of steel plate and mounted on wheels. The furnace is driven with friction wheels at each track band, operated through a differential drive which insures an absolutely even motion. These furnaces are patented in the United States and abroad.''
graphic for visual presentation of text This seems to have been an invention by Philip Argall and hence it is named 'Argall Roasting Furnace'. I did procure the colored version of this image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Image Note:
My Collection; From 'pic'page 370 in the 1898 Book 'The Mineral Industry, Its Statistics, Technology & Trade'. I did procure the colored version of this image.
Source, Printed Items (Found/Seen in/Known):
  • The Mineral Industry, Its Statistics, Technology & Trade in the U.S. and Other Countries 1898 (page 370 -> Page unnumbered) - Published in 1898.
Source, Internet (Found/Seen/Known):
Source ID, My Collection:
I-02412
Type/Category [Media ID]:
Photograph/Image [#479]
Shareable Link to Pic Info:
www.cripplecreekrailroads.com/01main/all_known_entities/pics_list-evry1_sort-newtop.php#479
View of the No. 2 dryer while in process of erection at the Metallic Mill. Its capacity was 180 to 200 tons per day. The dryers this mill used back in 1897/98 when this image was taken was of the tubular pattern. The No. 1 dryer consisted of four steel tubes nested together inside two track-bands and connected at the feed and discharge ends by two hoods. The tubes were lined with fireclay tile and revolve as one cylinder.
   As the text this image came with said; ''It will be noticed that the ore is divided into four thin streams and brought into intimate contact with the heated air and gases passing through the 18-in. tubes of the dryer. The motion of the ore advancing in these small tubes is very gentle and regular, and consequently produces but little dust. An improvement in the single cylinder dryer consisted in dividing it into quadrants by plates placed at right angles extending longitudinally through the cylinder. This improvement increased the drying efficiency of the cylinder at the expense of a higher dust loss and greater wear and tear, as the ore is alternately sliding along the plates from the center to the periphery and back to the center again during a revolution of the cylinder. By using four or more small tile-lined cylinders instead of one large cylinder divided into quadrants it was succeeded in again increasing the efficiency and reducing the dust loss and wear at the same time. It will be noticed that this tubular dryer is always in balance, the ore in an ascending tube being balanced by that in a descending one, or very nearly so. The capacity of No. 1 dryer is 80 to 100 tons per day.''
   This seems to have been an invention by Philip Argall and hence it is named 'Argall Drying Furnace'. I did procure the colored version of this image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Media Info Last Updated:
05.05.2022 (14:14:19)
Title on Image:
Argall Drying Furnace, Cyanide, Colo.
Photographer [Date]:
Unknown
Description:
View of the No. 2 dryer while in process of erection at the Metallic Mill. Its capacity was 180 to 200 tons per day. The dryers this mill used back in 1897/98 when this image was taken was of the tubular pattern. The No. 1 dryer consisted of four steel tubes nested together inside two track-bands and connected at the feed and discharge ends by two hoods. The tubes were lined with fireclay tile and revolve as one cylinder.
graphic for visual presentation of text As the text this image came with said; ''It will be noticed that the ore is divided into four thin streams and brought into intimate contact with the heated air and gases passing through the 18-in. tubes of the dryer. The motion of the ore advancing in these small tubes is very gentle and regular, and consequently produces but little dust. An improvement in the single cylinder dryer consisted in dividing it into quadrants by plates placed at right angles extending longitudinally through the cylinder. This improvement increased the drying efficiency of the cylinder at the expense of a higher dust loss and greater wear and tear, as the ore is alternately sliding along the plates from the center to the periphery and back to the center again during a revolution of the cylinder. By using four or more small tile-lined cylinders instead of one large cylinder divided into quadrants it was succeeded in again increasing the efficiency and reducing the dust loss and wear at the same time. It will be noticed that this tubular dryer is always in balance, the ore in an ascending tube being balanced by that in a descending one, or very nearly so. The capacity of No. 1 dryer is 80 to 100 tons per day.''
graphic for visual presentation of text This seems to have been an invention by Philip Argall and hence it is named 'Argall Drying Furnace'. I did procure the colored version of this image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Image Note:
My Collection; From 'pic'page 370 in the 1898 Book 'The Mineral Industry, Its Statistics, Technology & Trade'. I did procure the colored version of this image.
Source, Printed Items (Found/Seen in/Known):
  • The Mineral Industry, Its Statistics, Technology & Trade in the U.S. and Other Countries 1898 (page 370 -> Page unnumbered) - Published in 1898.
Source, Internet (Found/Seen/Known):
Source ID, My Collection:
I-02414
Type/Category [Media ID]:
Photograph/Image [#478]
Shareable Link to Pic Info:
www.cripplecreekrailroads.com/01main/all_known_entities/pics_list-evry1_sort-newtop.php#478
The works of the Metallic Extraction Co., the Bi-Metallic or just Metallic Mill, was situated at Cyanide, Colorado. A station that was on the Florence & Cripple Creek Railway, about 35 miles from the Cripple Creek District mines and two miles from Florence. Back in 1898 this was the oil center of Colorado, and hence was looked at as an ideal location as that part of the valley of the Arkansas had cheap and abundant  supply of coal and oil, and labor was plentiful.
   The works was erected on a flat site, following the opinion of Philip Argall that a flat site is preferable to a slope or terrace, since on the former works can be laid out not only to the best advantage but also can be operated at less expense. Ore from the Cripple Creek mines was delivered by the railway company on a double-track trestle that was at the two sampling works in use at this mill 20 ft. above the floor line of the works.
   View shows a mill work that covered quite a large site, where the mainline of the F. & C.C. ran in the foreground and the before mentioned trestle can be seen on the right half part of the image, about 1/3 up from bottom.
   I did procure the colored version of this image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Media Info Last Updated:
05.05.2022 (13:17:19)
Title on Image:
General View, Metallic Works, Cyanide, Colo.
Photographer [Date]:
Unknown
Description:
The works of the Metallic Extraction Co., the Bi-Metallic or just Metallic Mill, was situated at Cyanide, Colorado. A station that was on the Florence & Cripple Creek Railway, about 35 miles from the Cripple Creek District mines and two miles from Florence. Back in 1898 this was the oil center of Colorado, and hence was looked at as an ideal location as that part of the valley of the Arkansas had cheap and abundant supply of coal and oil, and labor was plentiful.
graphic for visual presentation of text The works was erected on a flat site, following the opinion of Philip Argall that a flat site is preferable to a slope or terrace, since on the former works can be laid out not only to the best advantage but also can be operated at less expense. Ore from the Cripple Creek mines was delivered by the railway company on a double-track trestle that was at the two sampling works in use at this mill 20 ft. above the floor line of the works.
graphic for visual presentation of text View shows a mill work that covered quite a large site, where the mainline of the F. & C.C. ran in the foreground and the before mentioned trestle can be seen on the right half part of the image, about 1/3 up from bottom.
graphic for visual presentation of text I did procure the colored version of this image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Image Note:
My Collection; From 'pic'page 370 in the 1898 Book 'The Mineral Industry, Its Statistics, Technology & Trade'. I did procure the colored version of this image.
Source, Printed Items (Found/Seen in/Known):
  • The Mineral Industry, Its Statistics, Technology & Trade in the U.S. and Other Countries 1898 (page 370 -> Page unnumbered) - Published in 1898.
Source, Internet (Found/Seen/Known):
Source ID, My Collection:
I-02413
Type/Category [Media ID]:
Photograph/Image [#477]
Shareable Link to Pic Info:
www.cripplecreekrailroads.com/01main/all_known_entities/pics_list-evry1_sort-newtop.php#477
This somewhat distant view at the structures making up the Metallic or Bi-Metallic Mill located at Cyanide, a stop along the main-line of the F. & C.C. on its route to Cripple Creek from Florence, shows a huge operation that lasted less than ten year. Late 1894 it is reported ground is being broken to create this mill, and in January 1904 it is fully burned down while being dismantled.
   I think the direction of this view is in a northwesterly direction. Just north of this location the Vesta branch of the F. & C.C. took off. But this was from the beginning a Cyanide based mill operation, while the other mills along the before mention Vesta branch was more into the Chlorination business from what I been able to understand. In 1903 this plant belongs to the United States Reduction & Refining Co.
   I did procure the colored version of the image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Media Info Last Updated:
16.12.2021 (16:26:44)
Title on Image:
Metallic Plant of U.S. Reduction and Refining Company
Photographer [Date]:
Unknown
Description:
This somewhat distant view at the structures making up the Metallic or Bi-Metallic Mill located at Cyanide, a stop along the main-line of the F. & C.C. on its route to Cripple Creek from Florence, shows a huge operation that lasted less than ten year. Late 1894 it is reported ground is being broken to create this mill, and in January 1904 it is fully burned down while being dismantled.
graphic for visual presentation of text I think the direction of this view is in a northwesterly direction. Just north of this location the Vesta branch of the F. & C.C. took off. But this was from the beginning a Cyanide based mill operation, while the other mills along the before mention Vesta branch was more into the Chlorination business from what I been able to understand. In 1903 this plant belongs to the United States Reduction & Refining Co.
graphic for visual presentation of text I did procure the colored version of the image. Source was gray-toned, or in common speech black & white. Used an online service and tweaked and worked with image to get what looks best to my eyes for the moment.
Image Note:
My Collection; From page 103 in the 1903 New Year issue of Cripple Creek Times. I did procure the colored version of this image.
Source, Printed Items (Found/Seen in/Known):
  • The Cripple Creek Times; New Years 1903 (page 103) - Published in 1903.
Source ID, My Collection:
I-02022
Type/Category [Media ID]:
Photograph/Image [#466]
Shareable Link to Pic Info:
www.cripplecreekrailroads.com/01main/all_known_entities/pics_list-evry1_sort-newtop.php#466